‘An effort to grasp endlessness through creative collaboration’ by Manolis

Manolis

In the process of writing ‘Roots’ for his collaborative work Vespers with BC Artist Ken Kirby, Manolis describes Vespers as a ‘a book of such elegance and grace, a book of such warmth and endless light, merging into a delightful balance of both art forms, intermingling in an almost liturgical celebration of the cosmos with all its greatness in its mega or its micro expression.

Now, Manolis shares his attempt to capture the vastness so dominant in Kirby’s painting of the inukshuk, through his poem ‘Roots’.

The poem ‘Roots’
‘My effort was to grasp endlessness, expressed by the Inukshuk’s open arms, and bring it forth, close by, before the observer-reader. To do so I had to find its staticity, or to use a different word, to find a base, a foundation for the image; henceforth the title ‘Roots’.

As a result the symbol, Inukshuk, turns into a liaison between…

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Ingersoll: Free Will

The Great Conversation

Commenting on the notion of free will, 19th century American thinker Robert G. Ingersoll writes, “People are under the necessity of feeding, clothing, and sheltering themselves. To the extent of their actual wants, they are not free. Every limitation is a master. Every finite being is a prisoner, and no man has ever yet looked above or beyond the prison walls.” In this video, we will discuss Ingersoll’s argument that free will does not exist.

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PLATO: The Republic [Book X]

The Great Conversation

In Book X of Plato’s Republic, Socrates banishes all artists from his ideal State. He argues that the creations of art are farthest removed from truth; and therefore, art turns the mind of the spectator away from truth and toward the realm of becoming. For example, there are several instances of tables in the world, but only one idea of a table. A table-maker can make a table, but he cannot make the idea of a table. Even farther removed from the true idea of a table than the table of a table-maker is the painting of a table. “Tables, then, are of three kinds, and there are three artists who superintend them: God, the maker of the table, and the painter.”

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