ETERNAL RECURRENCE

800px-Nietzsche187a

NIETZSCHE: Eternal Recurrence in True Detective

19th century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche once wrote, “What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: ‘This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more?’”
Nietzsche was profoundly affected by the concept of Eternal Recurrence. In Thus Spake Zarathustra, he referred to it as the “mightiest thought.” It is important to note, however, that Nietzsche did not introduce the theory of Eternal Recurrence. It is found in Ancient Egyptian and Indian philosophies. But Nietzsche’s practical application of the idea is innovative.
Instead of asserting Eternal Recurrence as a metaphysical truth, Nietzsche presents it to the reader as a hypothetical test to determine whether one is living a worthwhile life. Supposing that someone tells you Eternal Recurrence is true, that you will need to live your life over and over again for eternity, Nietzsche asks: “Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: ‘You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.’” The person who embraces Eternal Recurrence as a blessing from the divine is living a worthwhile life. On the other hand, the person who curses Eternal Recurrence as a torment sent from the devil ought to consider changing the path of life on which he is treading.
To conclude, Eternal Recurrence is the theory that time is like a circle, and that the life we live now, we will live innumerable times more for eternity. In short, our lives are like DVDs. Nietzsche introduces an innovative interpretation of this ancient concept. He is unconcerned about the validity of the theory, but rather presents the concept as a hypothetical test. In order to pass the test, one must live so “that one wants to have nothing different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity.”

ΝΙΤΣΕ: Η Αιώνια Επιστροφή για τον Άνθρωπο Ερευνητή

Ο φιλόσοφος του 19ου αιώνα Νίτσε έγραψε κάποτε, « Τί θα γινόταν αν κάποια στιγμή ένας δαίμονας ερχόταν κρυφά εκεί στην μοναξιά σου κι έλεγε: Η ζωή σου όπως την ζεις και την έχεις ζήσει στο παρελθόν, θα την ζήσεις ξανά στο μέλλον όχι μία φορά μόνον αλλά πολλές φορές;» Η έννοια της Αιώνιας Επιστροφής αναλύεται και σύμφωνα με το Νίτσε βλέπουμε και την πρακτική εφαρμογή της.
Η έννοια αυτή είχε μεγάλη επιρροή στη σκέψη του μεγάλου γερμανού φιλόσοφου. Στο Ζαρατούστρα του την ονομάζει την πιο δυνατή σκέψη. Αλλά είναι απαραίτητο να σημειώσουμε ότι η έννοια αυτή της Αιώνιας Επιστροφής δεν ήταν του Νίτσε. Προέρχεται από την αρχαία Αίγυπτο και την Ινδική φιλοσοφία. Αλλά η πρακτική εφαρμογή της έννοιας που προώθησε ο Νίτσε είναι πραγματικά καινούργια. Αντί να δεχτεί την έννοια της Αιώνιας Επιστροφής σαν μια μεταφυσική αλήθεια ο Νίτσε την προτείνει στον αναγνώστη σαν ένα υποθετικό τρόπο διαγωνισμού για να καταλάβει ο καθένας αν ζει τη ζωή του με αξιόλογο τρόπο. Αν κάποιος μας βεβαιώσει ότι η Αιώνια Επιστροφή είναι πραγματικότητα, ότι θα πρέπει να ζήσεις τη σημερνή σου ζωή ξανά και ξανά στον αιώνα τον άπαντα, ο Νίτσε ρωτά: «Θα `πεφτες κάτω στο χώμα και θα έτριζες τα δόντια σου και θα καταριόσουν το δαίμονα που σου μίλησε; Ή θα ήταν σαν να ξαναζούσες τη στιγμή που θα του απαντούσες : ‘Είσαι θεός και ποτέ δεν άκουσα κάτι πιο άγιο και πιο θεϊκό.’
Εκείνος που θ’ αγκάλιαζε την έννοια της Αιώνιας Επιστροφής σαν ευλογία από το Θεϊκό είναι το άτομο που ζει μια αξιόλογη ζωή. Αντίθετα εκείνος που καταριέται την Αιώνια Επιστροφή σαν ένα βασανιστήριο που του έστειλε ο δαίμονας θα ήταν σωστό να αναθεωρήσει το κάθε τι και ν’ αλλάξει τον τρόπο ζωής του.
Η Αιώνια Επιστροφή είναι η θεωρία ότι η ζωή είναι ένας κύκλος και ότι τη τωρινή μας ζωή την έχουμε ζήσει πολλές φορές. Ο Νίτσε αδιαφόρησε αν η θεωρία ήταν αληθινή ή όχι αλλά την παρουσίασε σαν ένα υποθετικό τρόπο δοκιμασίας κι εξέτασης. Για να περάσει κάποιος τις εξετάσεις αυτές πρέπει να ζει έτσι που να μην επιθυμεί τίποτα απολύτως διαφορετικό ούτε στο μέλλον, ούτε τώρα ούτε στο παρελθόν του για όλη την Αιωνιότητα.

~Original Article in English from the blog The Great Conversation

https://orwell1627.wordpress.com/

~Translated into Greek by Manolis Aligizakis

Τάσου Λειβαδίτη-Εκλεγμένα Ποιήματα/Tasos Livaditis-Selected Poems

Tasos Livaditis_Vanilla

ΜΙΑ ΚΟΙΝΗ ΚΑΜΑΡΑ

Ανέβαινα απ’ ώρα τη σκάλα, μου άνοιξε μια γριά με μια μαύρη
σκούφια, “εδώ έχουν πεθάνει πολλοί” μου λέει “γι αυτό ό,τι κι αν
πεις δεν ακούγεται”, τότε είδα κάποιον που σερνόταν κάτω απ’ τον
καναπέ, “τί ψάχνει;” ρώτησα, “ο Χριστός” μου λέει “θα `ρθει κι
άλλες φορές”, η γυναίκα έριχνε τα χαρτιά, τρόμαξα καθώς είδα το
χέρι της ν’ ανεβαίνει, “θα χάσεις πολλές φορές το δρόμο” μου λέει,
“μα πώς θα τον χάσω” της λέω “εγώ είμαι ανήπηρος και δεν περ-
πατάω, άλλος σέρνει το καροτσάκι”, “κι όμως θα τον χάσεις” μου
λέει, “είσαι μια πουτάνα” της λέω “να με ταράζεις άγιον άνθρωπο
—κι εσύ, αφού κανένας δε σε θέλει, γιατί κουνιέσαι;”, “δεν κουνιέ-
μαι εγώ” μου λέει “το καντήλι τρέμει”, την λυπήθηκα, “σε ξέρω”
τής λέω “δέν αποκλείεται, μάλιστα, να `χουμε ζήσει πολύν καιρό
μαζί”, η ώρα ήταν επτά ακριβώς, κοίταξα το ρολόι μου κι έδειχνε
κι εκείνο το ίδιο, “τώρα αρχίζει” σκέφτηκα με απόγνωση, κι η
γριά με συρτά βήματα πήγε και μαντάλωσε την πόρτα.

A COMMON ROOM

I was going up the stairs for a while when an old woman with a black
hood opened the door “everyone has died here” she says to me
“whatever you say nobody listens”; then I saw someone crawling
under the sofa “what is he looking for?” I asked “Christ” she says to me
“will come a few more times”; the woman started to read the cards
I was scared when I saw her hand pointing at me “you will lose
your way many a time” she says to me “how can I lose it” I say
“I’m crippled, I don’t walk, someone else pulls the cart”, “you will still
lose it”, “you are a whore” I say to her “and you disturb me, a holy man
—and you, if no one wants you why do you tease me?”, “I don’t tease
you, it’s the candle that flickers”; I felt sorry for her. “I know you”
I say to her “in fact it’s possible that we lived together long time ago”
the time was exactly seven o’clock; I looked at my watch and it showed
the same time “now she’ll start again” I thought in despair and
the old woman with slow steps went and locked the door.

~Τάσου Λειβαδίτη-Εκλεγμένα Ποιήματα/Μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη
~Tasos Livaditis-Selected Poems/Translated by Manolis Aligizakis
http://www.libroslibertad.ca