Tasos Livaditis/Τάσος Λειβαδίτης

 

cover

ΣΤΙΧΟΙ

 

Τα πεθαμένα παιδιά δεν έχουν πια το φόβο να μεγαλώσουν,

οι δρόμοι των τυφλών περνούν, καμιά φορά, μες’ απ’ τον ύπνο μας

η κατοικία μου ήταν πάντα εκεί που με σταμάτησε μια λέξη.

 

 

 

VERSES

 

Our dead children have no fear of growing up,

the roads of the blind sometimes come visit our dreams

my family home was always where a word stopped me.

 

 

TASOS LIVADITIS, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, Vancouver, 2014

www.libroslibertad.com

www.manolisaligizakis.com

Advertisements

Tasos Livaditis//Τάσος Λειβαδίτης

cover

ΑΠΛΑ ΛΟΓΙΑ

 

Βράδυ όμοιο σχεδόν με τ’ άλλα: η πλήξη, λιγοστό φως,

οι χαμένοι δρόμοι

κι άξαφνα κάποιος που σου λέει “είμαι φτωχός”, σαν να

σου δίνει μια μεγάλη υπόσχεση.

 

SIMPLE WORDS

 

The night almost same as all others: tediousness,

the faint light, lost paths

and suddenly someone says to you “I’m poor”, as though

giving you a great promise.

 

~Τάσου Λειβαδίτη-Εκλεγμένα Ποιήματα/Μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη

~Tasos Livaditis-Selected Poems/Translated by Manolis Aligizakis

 

www.libroslibertad.ca

www.manolisaligizakis.com

The Second Advent of Zeus

merging dimensions cover

ΔΥΑΔΙΚΟΤΗΤΑ

 

Και γέλασα με του κωμικού το αστείο

 

σαν να πιανόμουν απ’ το παραπέτο πλοίου

να μην πέσω στο αβυσσαλαίο στόμα

του θηριώδους λογικού κι άλλοι φανήκαν

για το σαρκίο μου πεινασμένοι άντρες

 

εύκολο που ήταν να μιλήσω με το απροσδιόριστο

όταν ξαφνικά τα σουβλερά ένιωσα δόντια

του αμείλικτου ρολογιού να παίζουν

το παράξενό τους ύμνο που θρηνούσε

την κάθοδό μου προς στο Έρεβος, εκεί

 

που μ’ υποδέχτηκε η συγγένειά μου

κι αμέσως μετά στη κηδεία του θείου Αντώνη

προς το γαμήλιο γλέντι βηματίσαμε

προς όλων έκπληξη κι εγώ που εμφανίστηκα νωρίς

και καταλάβαμε το νόημα του αετού

που πέταγε ψηλάθε στον αιθέρα

σα να βεβαίωνε πάνω  στη γη

και στο υπόβαθρό της πως υπήρξαμε

 

 

DUALITY

 

And I laughed at the comedian’s joke

 

as if I grabbed onto the ship’s handrail

that I wouldn’t fall into the abysmal

mouth of the monstrous logic and

many men appeared hungry for my flesh

easy it was to talk to the inexplicable

when suddenly I felt the fangs

of the inexorable clock ticking

their strange hymn lamenting

my descent to Erebus, where

 

my family greeted me and after

my uncle Antony’s funeral

we walked to the marital celebration

to the surprise of all that I was also there

and we understood the meaning of the eagle

flying over us as if to confirm

on this earth and under it that we’ve lived

 

 

SECOND ADVENT OF ZEUS, Ekstasis Editions, Victoria, BC, 2016

Kostas Karyotakis//Κώστας Καρυωτάκης

379full-kostas-karyotakis

ΘΑΛΑΣΣΑ

Ὅμως τὰ στήθια ποὺ τὰ ταράζει κάποιο
θανάσιμο πάθος δὲν θὰ γαληνέψουν

Τὰ σύννεφα γιγάντικα φαντάζουν κι ἀσημένια
στὸ μολυβένιον οὐρανὸ
σὰν τὰ χτυπᾷ τοῦ ἥλιου τὸ φῶς· σὰν τὰ χτυπᾷ ὁ ἀγέρας
φεύγουνε πίσω ἀπ᾿ τὸ βουνό.

Κι εἶναι θεριὸ ἡ θάλασσα. Τὸ παρδαλό της χρῶμα
δίνει της — μπλαβὸ ἐκεῖ μακριά,
πιὸ δῶθε ἀνοιχτοπράσινο κι ἀκόμα δῶθε γκρίζο —
κάποια παράξενη θωριά.

SEA

 

Yet the heart that was stirred

by a deadly passion will never relax

 

the clouds seem gigantic and silvery

onto the leaden sky

as if the sun reflection shines on them

as if the wind blows onto them

they run behind the mountain

 

the sea is a beast and its colorful surface,

dark blue at the far side

nearer light green and closer gray,

as if dressing it with a strange garment

 

 

KOSTAS KARYOTAKIS//translated by Manolis Aligizakis

www.manolisaligizakis.com

Κ. Καβάφης//C. Cavafy

!cid_73928743-773D-47E5-B066-8F82C0F99FC6@local

THIS MUCH I GAZED

This much I have gazed on beauty—,
my vision is filled with it.

Contours of the body. Red lips. Sensual limbs.
Hair as if taken from Greek statues;
always beautiful, even when undone,
and falling, a bit, on the white brow.
Faces of love, as my poetry
wished them…in the nights of my early manhood,
in my nights, secretly, met…

ΕΤΣΙ ΠΟΛΥ ΑΤΕΝΙΣΑ
Την εμορφιά έτσι πολύ ατένισα
που πλήρης είναι αυτής η όρασίς μου.

Γραμμές του σώματος. Κόκκινα χείλη. Μέλη ηδονικά.
Μαλλιά σαν από αγάλματα ελληνικά παρμένα
πάντα έμορφα, κι αχτένιστα σαν είναι,
και πέφτουν λίγο, επάνω στ’ άσπρα μέτωπα.
Πρόσωπα της αγάπης, όπως τάθελεν
η ποίησίς μου…μες στες νύχτες της νεότητός μου,
μέσα στες νύχτες μου, κρυφά, συναντημένα…

 

http://www.ekstasiseditions.com

George Seferis//Γιώργος Σεφέρης

George Seferis_cover

George Seferis’ Speech at the Nobel Banquet at the City Hall in Stockholm, December 10, 1963 (Translation)

I feel at this moment that I am a living contradiction. The Swedish Academy has decided that my efforts in a language famous through the centuries but not widespread in its present form are worthy of this high distinction. It is paying homage to my language – and in return I express my gratitude in a foreign language.

I hope you will accept the excuses I am making to myself. I belong to a small country. A rocky promontory in the Mediterranean, it has nothing to distinguish it but the efforts of its people, the sea, and the light of the sun. It is a small country, but its tradition is immense and has been handed down through the centuries without interruption. The Greek language has never ceased to be spoken. It has undergone the changes that all living things experience, but there has never been a gap. This tradition is characterized by love of the human; justice is its norm. In the tightly organized classical tragedies the man who exceeds his measure is punished by the Erinyes. And this norm of justice holds even in the realm of nature.

«Helios will not overstep his measure»; says Heraclitus, «otherwise the Erinyes, the ministers of Justice, will find him out». A modern scientist might profit by pondering this aphorism of the Ionian philosopher. I am moved by the realization that the sense of justice penetrated the Greek mind to such an extent that it became a law of the physical world. One of my masters exclaimed at the beginning of the last century,

«We are lost because we have been unjust» He was an unlettered man, who did not learn to write until the age of thirty-five. But in the Greece of our day the oral tradition goes back as far as the written tradition, and so does poetry. I find it significant that Sweden wishes to honour not only this poetry, but poetry in general, even when it originates in a small people. For I think that poetry is necessary to this modern world in which we are afflicted by fear and disquiet. Poetry has its roots in human breath – and what would we be if our breath were diminished? Poetry is an act of confidence – and who knows whether our unease is not due to a lack of confidence?

Last year, around this table, it was said that there is an enormous difference between the discoveries of modern science and those of literature, but little difference between modern and Greek dramas. Indeed, the behaviour of human beings does not seem to have changed. And I should add that today we need to listen to that human voice which we call poetry, that voice which is constantly in danger of being extinguished through lack of love, but is always reborn. Threatened, it has always found a refuge; denied, it has always instinctively taken root again in unexpected places. It recognizes no small nor large parts of the world; its place is in the hearts of men the world over. It has the charm of escaping from the vicious circle of custom.

I owe gratitude to the Swedish Academy for being aware of these facts; for being aware that language which are said to have restricted circulation should not become barriers which might stifle the beating of the human heart; and for being a true Areopagus, able «to judge with solemn truth life’s ill-appointed lot», to quote Shelley, who, it is said, inspired

Alfred Nobel, whose grandeur of heart redeems inevitable violence. In our gradually shrinking world, everyone is in need of all the others. We must look for man wherever we can find him. When on his way to Thebes Oedipus encountered the Sphinx, his answer to its riddle was: «Man». That simple word destroyed the monster. We have many monsters to destroy. Let us think of the answer of Oedipus.

~From Nobel Lectures, Literature 1901-1967, Editor Horst Frenz, Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1969

 

Γιῶργος Σεφέρης – Ὁμιλία κατὰ την ἀπονομὴ του Νόμπελ Λογοτεχνίας στη Στοκχόλμη

 

Τούτη την ώρα αἰσθάνομαι πως είμαι ο ίδιος μία ἀντίφαση. Ἀλήθεια, η Σουηδικὴ Ἀκαδημία, έκρινε πως η προσπάθειά μου σε μία γλώσσα περιλάλητη επὶ αιώνες, αλλὰ στην παρούσα μορφή της περιορισμένη, άξιζε αυτὴ την υψηλὴ διάκριση. Θέλησε να τιμήσει τη γλώσσα μου, και να – εκφράζω τώρα τις ευχαριστίες μου σε ξένη γλώσσα. Σας παρακαλώ να μου δώσετε τη συγνώμη που ζητώ πρώτα -πρώτα απὸ τον εαυτό μου.
Ανήκω σε μία χώρα μικρή. Ένα πέτρινο ἀκρωτήρι στη Μεσόγειο, που δεν έχει άλλο ἀγαθὸ παρὰ τὸν αγώνα του λαού, τη θάλασσα, και το φως του ήλιου. Είναι μικρὸς ο τόπος μας, αλλὰ η παράδοσή του είναι τεράστια και το πράγμα που τη χαρακτηρίζει είναι ότι μας παραδόθηκε χωρὶς διακοπή. Η ἑλληνικὴ γλώσσα δεν έπαψε ποτέ της να μιλιέται. Δέχτηκε τις αλλοιώσεις που δέχεται καθετὶ ζωντανό, ἀλλὰ δεν παρουσιάζει κανένα χάσμα. Άλλο χαρακτηριστικὸ αὐτής της παράδοσης είναι η ἀγάπη της για την ἀνθρωπιά, κανόνας της είναι η δικαιοσύνη. Στην ἀρχαία τραγωδία, την οργανωμένη με τόση ακρίβεια, ο άνθρωπος που ξεπερνά το μέτρο, πρέπει να τιμωρηθεί απὸ τις Ερινύες.
Όσο για μένα συγκινούμαι παρατηρώντας πώς η συνείδηση της δικαιοσύνης είχε τόσο πολὺ διαποτίσει την ελληνικὴ ψυχή, ώστε να γίνει κανόνας του φυσικού κόσμου. Κι ένας απὸ τους διδασκάλους μου, των αρχών του περασμένου αιώνα, γράφει: «… θα χαθούμε γιατί αδικήσαμε …». Αυτὸς ο άνθρωπος ήταν ἀγράμματος. Είχε μάθει να γράφει στα τριάντα πέντε χρόνια της ηλικίας του. Αλλὰ στην Ελλάδα των ημερών μας, η προφορικὴ παράδοση πηγαίνει μακριὰ στα περασμένα όσο και η γραπτή. Το ίδιο και η ποίηση. Είναι για μένα σημαντικὸ το γεγονὸς ότι η Σουηδία θέλησε να τιμήσει και τούτη την ποίηση καὶ όλη την ποίηση γενικά, ακόμη και όταν ἀναβρύζει ἀνάμεσα σ᾿ ένα λαὸ περιορισμένο. Γιατί πιστεύω πως τούτος ο σύγχρονος κόσμος όπου ζοῦμε, ο τυραννισμένος απὸ το φόβο και την ανησυχία, τη χρειάζεται την ποίηση. Η ποίηση έχει τις ρίζες της στην ανθρώπινη ανάσα – και τί θα γινόμασταν άν η πνοή μας λιγόστευε; Είναι μία πράξη ἐμπιστοσύνης – κι ένας Θεὸς το ξέρει άν τα δεινά μας δεν τα χρωστάμε στη στέρηση εμπιστοσύνης.
Παρατήρησαν, τον περασμένο χρόνο γύρω απὸ τούτο το τραπέζι, την πολὺ μεγάλη διαφορὰ ανάμεσα στις ανακαλύψεις της σύγχρονης ἐπιστήμης και στη λογοτεχνία. Παρατήρησαν πως ανάμεσα σ᾿ ένα ἀρχαίο ελληνικὸ δράμα κι ένα σημερινό, η διαφορὰ είναι λίγη. Ναι, η συμπεριφορὰ του ανθρώπου δε μοιάζει να έχει αλλάξει βασικά. Και πρέπει να προσθέσω πως νιώθει πάντα την ανάγκη ν᾿ ακούσει τούτη την ανθρώπινη φωνὴ που ονομάζουμε ποίηση. Αυτὴ η φωνὴ που κινδυνεύει να σβήσει κάθε στιγμὴ απὸ στέρηση αγάπης και ολοένα ξαναγεννιέται. Κυνηγημένη, ξέρει ποὺ νά ῾βρει καταφύγιο, απαρνημένη, έχει το ένστικτο να πάει να ριζώσει στοὺς πιο απροσδόκητους τόπους. Γι᾿ αυτὴ δεν υπάρχουν μεγάλα και μικρὰ μέρη του κόσμου. Το βασίλειό της είναι στις καρδιὲς όλων των ανθρώπων της γης. Έχει τη χάρη ν᾿ αποφεύγει πάντα τη συνήθεια, αυτὴ τη βιομηχανία. Χρωστώ την ευγνωμοσύνη μου στη Σουηδικὴ Ακαδημία που ένιωσε αυτὰ τα πράγματα, που ένιωσε πως οι γλώσσες, οι λεγόμενες περιορισμένης χρήσης, δεν πρέπει να καταντούν φράχτες όπου πνίγεται ο παλμὸς της ανθρώπινης καρδιάς, που έγινε ένας Άρειος Πάγος ικανὸς να κρίνει με αλήθεια επίσημη την άδικη μοίρα της ζωής, για να θυμηθώ τον Σέλλεϋ, τον εμπνευστή, καθὼς μας λένε, του Αλφρέδου Νομπέλ, αυτοῦ του ανθρώπου που μπόρεσε να εξαγοράσει την αναπόφευκτη βία με τη μεγαλοσύνη της καρδιάς του.
Σ᾿ αυτὸ τον κόσμο, που ολοένα στενεύει, ο καθένας μας χρειάζεται όλους τους άλλους. Πρέπει ν᾿ αναζητήσουμε τον άνθρωπο, όπου και να βρίσκεται.
Όταν στο δρόμο της Θήβας, ο Οιδίπους συνάντησε τη Σφίγγα, κι αυτὴ του έθεσε το αίνιγμά της, η απόκρισή του ήταν: ο άνθρωπος. Τούτη η απλὴ λέξη χάλασε το τέρας. Έχουμε πολλὰ τέρατα να καταστρέψουμε. Ας συλλογιστούμε την απόκριση του Οἰδίποδα.

http://www.wikipedia.org

GEORGE SEFERIS-COLLECTED POEMS//Translated by MANOLIS ALIGIZAKIS

Image

DENIAL

On the secluded seashore
white like a dove
we thirsted at noon;
but the water was brackish.

On the golden sand
we wrote her name;
when the sea breeze blew
the writing vanished.

With what heart, with what spirit
what desire and what passion
we led our life; what a mistake!
so we changed our life.
ΑΡΝΗΣΗ

Στο περιγιάλι το κρυφό
κι άσπρο σαν περιστέρι
διψάσαμε το μεσημέρι
μα το νερό γλυφό.

Πάνω στην άμμο την ξανθή
γράψαμε τ’ όνομά της
ωραία που φύσηξε ο μπάτης
και σβύστηκε η γραφή.

Με τί καρδιά, με τί πνοή,
τί πόθους και τί πάθος
πήραμε τη ζωή μας, λάθος!
Κι αλλάξαμε ζωή.

~George Seferis-Collected Poems, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2012

ILLEGALITIES, BY KIKI DIMOULA–translated by Manolis Aligizakis

Kiki_Dimoula

ILLEGALITIES

Illegitimately
I expand and experience
on plains existing
that the others don’t accept

there I stop and present
my persecuted world
there I recreate it
with small insubordinate tools
there I devote it
to a sun
shapeless, lightless
motionless
my personal sun

there I occur

however at sometime
this ends and
I contract and
I violently return
(to calm down)
to the known and acceptable
plain of
the earthly bitterness and

I’m proved to be wrong

~ Kiki Dimoula, from the book “By Default”, Ikaros, Athens, Greece, 1958
~ Poem translated by Manolis Aligizakis

ΠΑΡΑΝΟΜΙΕΣ

Επεκτείνομαι και βιώνω
παράνομα
σε περιοχές που σαν υπαρκτές
δεν παραδέχονται οι άλλοι.
Εκεί σταματώ και εκθέτω
τον καταδιωγμένο κόσμο μου,
εκεί τον αναπαράγω
με πικρά κι απειθάρχητα μέσα,
εκεί τον αναθέτω
σ’ έναν ήλιο
χωρίς σχήμα, χωρίς φως,
αμετακίνητο,
προσωπικό μου.
Εκεί συμβαίνω.
Κάποτε, όμως,
παύει αυτό.
Και συστέλλομαι,
κι επανέρχομαι βίαια
(προς καθησυχασμόν)
στη νόμιμη και παραδεκτή
περιοχή,
στην εγκόσμια πίκρα.
Και διαψεύδομαι.

~ Από τη συλλογή Ερήμην (1958) της Κικής Δημουλά, Ίκαρος, Αθήνα, 1958
~ Source of the Greek version of the poem: http://www.greek-translation-wings.blogspot.gr

BIOGRAPHY

Kiki Dimoula (Greek: Κική Δημουλά; 19 June 1931, Athens) is a Greek poet.
Dimoula’s work is haunted by the existential dissolution of the post-war era. Her central themes are hopelessness, insecurity, absence and oblivion. Using diverse subjects (from a “Marlboro boy” to mobile phones) and twisting grammar in unconventional ways, she accentuates the power of the words through astonishment and surprise, but always manages to retain a sense of hope.
Her poetry has been translated into English, French, German, Swedish, Danish, Spanish, Italian and many other languages. In 2014, the eleventh issue of Tinpahar published ‘Kiki Dimoula in Translation’, which featured three English translations of her better known works.
Dimoula has been awarded the Greek State Prize twice (1971, 1988), as well as the Kostas and Eleni Ouranis Prize (1994) and the Αριστείο Γραμμάτων of the Academy of Athens (2001). She was awarded the European Prize for Literature for 2009. Since 2002, Dimoula is a member of the Academy of Athens
Dimoula worked as a clerk for the Bank of Greece. She was married to the poet Athos Dimoulas (1921–1985), with whom she had two children.

REMORSES AND REGRETS

1484735_572781182796300_1883774974_n

ΥΠΟΘΕΣΕΙΣ

Ταχτοποίησες όλες τις υποθέσεις σου
με συγγενείς και φίλους

που ποτέ δεν θυμούνται
να σε καλέσουν
σε χαρούμενες μέρες
αλλά μόνο σε κηδείες.

Ταχτοποίησες τις ενοχλητικές σου
αναμνήσεις, όνειρα απραγματοποίητα

και τώρα γαλήνιος βάζεις
το καπέλο σου και ξεκινάς
έξω απ’ τη φυλακή σου να βαδίσεις

μία στροφή προς το εμπορικό κέντρο
που θα συναντήσεις φίλους σου
και μετά από μια παρτίδα τάβλι
δύο καφέδες και τρία τσιγάρα

θα επιστρέφεις πάλι σπίτι
για μιαν ακόμα βουβή βραδιά.

AFFAIRS

You’ve settled your affairs with
friends and relatives who
forget to call you during their

festive events though they always
invite you to funerals

you’ve settled with annoying memories
dreams that never turned into reality

in peace with yourself now
you put on your cap and

walk out of your prison
turn toward the shopping mall
where you’ll meet your pals and

after a game of backgammon
two coffees and three cigarettes

you walk back to your house
for another long soundless night

OF REMORSES AND REGRETS, Collection in Progress.

OF REMORSES and REGRETS

11167993_373787862810157_1549215843426208414_o

WATER WELL

Water-well springs to the foreground the matador’s blood that decorates goring horns of the bull and another opulent song dances on the white petals of the gardenia flower: save this moment before the irresistible Hades walks your way.

—You need to dig the garden but you watch TV all day long.

I drink the traditional bitter coffee while you lay in the coffin like a definition of exactly the opposite you ought to be yet when my time will arrive to fit in the width and length of the same casket you won’t return to drink my bitter coffee.

—You remember when you went hunting and the car engine froze on you?

Hoarfrost of April still around when the heartless Hades pierces my heart, the first swallows dance in the air and my mother covered the red eggs of Easter under the kitchen towel hiding them from my eyes.

—Get up and take the garbage to the sidewalk, you lazy bum.

And I beg Hades to bring you back to me, my beloved. His sardonic laughter a macabre omen and in the form of a song he whispers.

—Since I’ve left you alone your other half I needed to take: to balance the universe.

ΠΗΓΑΔΙ

Απ’το πηγάδι πηγάζει η ζωή του ταυρομάχου που το αίμα του στολίζει τα κέρατα του ταύρου που τον κάρφωσαν και τ’ οπάλινο τραγούδι χορεύει στα λευκά της γαρδένιας πέταλα: κράτησε τη στιγμή αυτη προτού ο ευδιάθετος Χάρος σε επιλέξει.

—Πρέπει να σκάψεις τον κήπο κι εσύ όλη μέρα χαζεύεις την τηλεόραση.

Πίνω τον παραδοσιακό πικρό καφέ κι εσύ κείτεσαι στο φέρετρο, ακριβής ορισμός του αντίθετου που μέλλουσουν να γίνεις κι όταν η ώρα μου έρθει κι εγώ να μετρήσω το μάκρος και το πλάτος του φερέτρου αυτού εσύ δεν θα `σαι `κει να πιεις τον πικρό καφέ σου.

—Θυμάσαι τότε που πήγες κυνήγι κι η μηχανή του αυτοκινήτου πάγωσε απ’ την παγωνιά;

Παγωνιά του Απρίλη που ο άκαρδος Χάρος την καρδιά μου πλήγωσε, τα πρώτα χελιδόνια χορεύουν στον αέρα κι η μάνα μου σκέπασε με μια πετσέτα τα κόκκινα Πασχαλινά αβγά για να τα κρύψει απ’ τα δυο λαίμαργά μου μάτια.

—Σήκω και βγάλε τα σκουπίδια στο δρόμο, τεμπέλη.

Κι εγώ το Χάρο παρακαλώ να σε γυρίσει πίσω, αγαπημένη μου. Γελά σαρδόνια και σαν τραγουδιστά μου ψυθιρίζει

—Σου χάρισα τη ζωή. Το έτερό σου ήμυσι έπρεπε να πάρω την ισορροπία να διατηρήσω.

~ OF REMORSES and REGRETS, Collection in progress, Vancouver, BC, 2015