ODYSSEY by NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS

images74001

ODYSSEY A

And when in his wide courtyards Odysseus had cut down
the insolent youths, he hung on high his sated bow
and strode to the warm bath to cleanse his bloodstained body.
Two slaves prepared his bath, but when they saw their lord
they shrieked with terror, for his loins and belly steamed
and thick black blood dripped down from both his murderous palms
their copper jugs rolled clanging on the marble tiles.
The wandering man smiled gently in his horny beard
and with his eyebrows signed the frightened girls to go.

ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑ Α

Σαν πια ποθέρισε τους γαύρους νιους μες στις φαρδιές αυλές του,
το καταχόρταστο ανακρέμασε δοξάρι του ο Δυσσέας
και διάβη στο θερμό λουτρό, το μέγα του κορμί να πλύνει.
Δυο δούλες συγκερνούσαν το νερό, μα ως είδαν τον αφέντη
μπήξαν φωνή, γιατι η σγουρή κοιλιά και τα μεριά του αχνίζαν
και μαύρα στάζαν αίματα πηχτά κι από τις δυο του φούχτες
και κύλησαν στις πλάκες οι χαλκές λαγήνες τους βροντώντας.
Ο πολυπλάνητος γελάει πραγά μες στα στριφτά του γένια
και γνέφει παίζοντας τα φρύδια του στις κοπελλιές να φύγουν.
Το χλιο πολληώρα φραίνουνταν νερό κι οι φλέβες του ξαπλώναν
μες το κορμί σαν ποταμοί, και τα νεφρά του δροσερεύαν
κι ο μέγας νους μες στο νερό ξαστέρωνε κι αναπαυόταν.

~ODYSSEY, by NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS, translated by KIMON FRIAR

Nikos Kazantzakis
1883-1957
Nikos Kazantzakis was born in Heraklion, Crete, when the island was still under Ottoman rule. He studied law in Athens (1902-06) before moving to Paris to pursue postgraduate studies in philosophy (1907-09) under Henri Bergson. It was at this time that he developed a strong interest in Nietzsche and seriously took to writing. After returning to Greece, he continued to travel extensively, often as a newspaper correspondent. He was appointed Director General of the Ministry of Social Welfare (1919) and Minister without Portfolio (1945), and served as a literary advisor to UNESCO (1946). Among other distinctions, he was president of the Hellenic Literary Society, received the International Peace Award in Vienna in 1956 and was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Kazantzakis regarded himself as a poet and in 1938 completed his magnum opus, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, divided into 24 rhapsodies and consisting of a monumental 33,333 verses. He distinguished himself as a playwright (The Prometheus Trilogy, Kapodistrias, Kouros, Nicephorus Phocas, Constantine Palaeologus, Christopher Columbus, etc), travel writer (Spain, Italy, Egypt, Sinai, Japan-China, England, Russia, Jerusalem and Cyprus) and thinker (The Saviours of God, Symposium). He is, of course, best known for his novels Zorba the Greek (1946), The Greek Passion (1948), Freedom or Death (1950), The Last Temptation of Christ (1951) and his semi-autobiographical Report to Greco (1961). His works have been translated and published in over 50 countries and have been adapted for the theatre, the cinema, radio and television.

Tasos Livaditis-Selected Poems/Τάσου Λειβαδίτη-Εκλεγμένα Ποιήματα

Tasos Livaditis_Vanilla

 

ΤΕΡΨΕΙΣ ΤΟΥ ΑΠΟΓΕΥΜΑΤΟΣ

Ή μάλλον γιά νά `μαι πιό συγκεκριμένος όλα ξεκίνησαν απ’
αυτό τό ρολόι, ένα ρολόι ηλίθιο καί φαλακρό, εγώ τί έφταιξα—
απλώς καθόμουν τ’ απογεύματα ήσυχος στόν καναπέ κι έτρωγα
τίς θείες μου σέ νεαρή ηλικία, αλλά μιά μιά, γιά νά μή φανεί απότομα
η γύμνια τού τοίχου ή μιά φορά στό δρόμο έφτυσα αίμα, τόσο η
πόλη ήταν ακαλαίσθητη
καί μόνον η έλλειψη κάθε ενδιαφέροντος γιά τούς άλλους είναι
πού έδωσε στή ζωή μας αυτό τό ατέλειωτο βάθος.

AFTERNOON DELIGHTS

Or perhaps to be more accurate it all started by
this clock a stupid bald headed clock, it wasn’t my fault —
every afternoon I simply sat quietly on the sofa and ate my
young unties, however but one by one so that the emptiness
of the wall wouldn’t show or another time in the street I spat
blood so much the city was inelegant
that only the lack of interest for others gave our lives
this endless depth.

Τάσου Λειβαδίτη-Εκλεγμένα Ποιήματα/Μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη
Tasos Livaditis-Selected Poems/Translated by Manolis Aligizakis

Constantine Cavafy-Poems/Κωνσταντίνος Καβάφης-Ποιήματα

!cid_73928743-773D-47E5-B066-8F82C0F99FC6@local

ΕΠΕΣΤΡΕΦΕ

Επέστρεφε συχνά και παίρνε με,

αγαπημένη αίσθησις επέτρεφε και παίρνε με—

όταν ξυπνά του σώματος η μνήμη,

κ’ επιθυμία παληά ξαναπερνά στο αίμα

όταν τα χείλη και το δέρμα ενθυμούνται,

κ’ αισθάνονται τα χέρια σαν ν’ αγγίζουν πάλι.

Επέστρεφε συχνά και παίρνε με την νύχτα,

όταν τα χείλη και το δέρμα ενθυμούνται…

COME BACK

Come back often and take me,

beloved sensation, come back and take me—

when the memory in my body awakens,

and the old desire again runs through my blood;

when the lips and the skin remember

and the hands feel as if they were touching again.

Come back often and take me at night,

when the lips and the skin remember…

Ο ΚΑΘΡΕΠΤΗΣ ΣΤΗΝ ΕΙΣΟΔΟ

Το πλούσιο σπίτι είχε στην είσοδο

έναν καθρέπτη μέγιστο, πολύ παλαιό

τουλάχιστον προ ογδόντα ετών αγορασμένο.

Ένα εμορφότατο παιδί, υπάλληλος σε ράπτη

(τές Κυριακές, ερασιτέχνης αθλητής),

στέκονταν μ’ ένα δέμα. Το παρέδοσε

σε κάποιον του σπιτιού, κι αυτός το πήγε μέσα

να φέρει την απόδειξη. Ο υπάλληλος του ράπτη

έμεινε μόνος, και περίμενε.

Πλησίασε στον καθρέπτη και κυττάζονταν

κ’ έσιαζε την κραβάτα του. Μετά πέντε λεπτά

του φέραν την απόδειξη. Την πήρε κ’ έφυγε.

Μα ο παλαιός καθρέπτης που είχε δει και δει

κατά την ύπαρξί του την πολυετή

χιλιάδες πράγματα και πρόσωπα

μα ο παλαιός καθρέπτης τώρα χαίρονταν,

κ’ επαίρονταν που είχε δεχτεί επάνω του

την άρτιαν εμορφιά για μερικά λεπτά.

THE MIRROR BY THE ENTRANCE

The wealthy house had in its entry way

a huge, quite old mirror;

bought at least eighty years ago.

A very handsome young man, a tailor’s employee,

(on Sundays an amateur athlete)

stood there holding a parcel. He gave it

to a member of the household, who went inside

to get a receipt. The tailor’s employee

was left alone, and waited.

He went close to the mirror and had a look

at himself and he adjusted his tie. Five minutes later

they brought him the receipt. He took it and left.

But the old mirror that had seen and seen,

during its long years of life,

thousands of things and faces;

the old mirror rejoiced now,

and felt proud that it had received

that gorgeous beauty for a few minutes.

Constantine Cavafy-Poems/Translation by Manolis Aligizakis

Κωνσταντίνος Καβάφης-Ποιήματα/Μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη

www.libroslibertad.ca

www.ekstasiseditions.com